First image of black hole released in Shanghai along with other cities worldwide

                            2019-04-11 01:48:55 GMT2019-04-11 09:48:55(Beijing Time) Xinhua English
                            The first-ever image of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the distant galaxy M87 is released during a press conference held by Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)  The first-ever image of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the distant galaxy M87 is released during a press conference held by Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)
                            Chinese researchers discuss the imaging methods of the image of a black hole in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 9, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)  Chinese researchers discuss the imaging methods of the image of a black hole in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 9, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)
                            A Chinese astronomer answers questions raised by journalists during a press conference held in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)  A Chinese astronomer answers questions raised by journalists during a press conference held in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)
                            Some Chinese astronomers who have made contributions to a global effort to capture the first-ever image of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the distant galaxy M87, pose for a group photo during a press conference held in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)  Some Chinese astronomers who have made contributions to a global effort to capture the first-ever image of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the distant galaxy M87, pose for a group photo during a press conference held in Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SAO), in east China's Shanghai, April 10, 2019. The image of the black hole, based on observations through the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration, was unveiled in coordinated press conferences across the globe at around 9:00 p.m. (Beijing time) on Wednesday. The landmark result offers scientists a new way to study the most extreme objects in the universe predicted by Albert Einstein's general relativity. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)
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